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Taos Archaeological Society?


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The Taos Archaeological Society

 March 2024

 Next Speaker



March 4, 2024

Lisa Thompson
   In 2012, after finishing an impactful archeological field school in Jordan, I graduated from Missouri State University with a Bachelor of Arts in History and a dream of becoming a professional archeologist. Following an archaeology internship with the National Park Service at the Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield in 2013, I picked up and headed west to Cimarron, New Mexico. I took a position at a local ranch in Colfax County as a museum collections manager and onsite archaeologist, thus beginning my lifelong study into New Mexico history and culture and my own heritage as a Chicana. Finding my home in the mountains of Northern New Mexico, I moved to Taos and never looked back. I worked as an archeologist in private sector Cultural Resource Management until 2017 and in 2018, I entered the Forest Service as an Archaeologist. I am currently finishing an MA in Southwest Studies in Anthropology from New Mexico Highlands University. My thesis research focuses on historic trade networks in Northern New Mexico during the Mexican Period (1821-1848 CE) through the lens of Latinidad Archaeology and Borderlands Theory.

My talk will focus on my current thesis work which seeks to address two main research questions and a set of associated sub-questions.
 - How did the new trade and captive-exchange policies under the Mexican Government affect the ongoing mestizaje in this multiethnic borderland community?
 - How has the continuation of Ranchos de Taos as a borderland between Indigenous groups affected the development of identities during the Mexican Period from approximately 1800 to 1850 CE following the end of the Spanish colonial period?

Throughout my research, the following sub questions are also being considered, if not fully investigated:
 - Can the historic archaeological approaches to nineteenth-century cultural material identify tangible elements of an ethnic identity related to mestizaje in Ranchos de Taos? If so, how has peoples' interpretation of the archaeological record affected how archaeologists and historians have previously understood multicultural identities of this time and place? 


Cuba

January 14-22, 2025

 

Tuesday January 14

Depart ABQ

 Arrive Miami

Wednesday January 15

Depart Miami

Arrive Havana

Walking Tour

Inglaterra

Central Park

Thursday January 16

                                                                                                              Cuban Art Museum

                                                                                                                       Capitolio

Grand Teatro

Bacardi Building

Market

Friday January 17

Day trip to Vinales

Soroa Gardens

Tobacco Farm

Saturday January 18

Cristobal Colon Cemetery

Parque John Lennon

Plaza of the Revolution

Sunday January 19

Day trip to Vinales

Soroa Gardens

Tobacco Farm

Monday January 20

Santaria Tour

Callejon de Hammel

Fuster Art Studio

Hotel Nacional

Tuesday January 21

Hemingway House Museum

Cojimar

Beach Day

Wednesday January 22

  Depart Havana

 Arrive ABQ


Trip Cost: $2950.00

Cost includes: All hotels (double occupancy) (single supplement $325.00), all meals (except travel days), Cuban visa, Cuban Health insurance, all ground transportation, all transfers, entrance fees, guiding and gratuities.

Not included RT ABQ To Havana, hotel in Miami, all beverages, meals on travel days.



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 TAS Virtual Lecture Series:

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History of Taos Archaeological Society Project


 An effort is currently underway to build a historical timeline of TAS events and history! We need your help!

The Taos Archaeological Society has operated for 34 years. In that time, many documents have been produced. Unfortunately, TAS does not have a complete record of documents produced and distributed.

  We are in need of documents/publications that date from September 1999 through February 2014. 

 You can help by contributing:

Past bulletins, meeting minutes, financial statements, member lists, and other communications. 

Thank you for your continued support of the Taos Archaeological Society.

For more information, or to send documents, please contact Paul Mcguff  at pmcguff@aol.com


                                                                                             


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Mesa Prieta

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Taos Archaeological Society

PO Box 143

Taos, NM, 87571

Admin@TaosArch.org

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